Code of Conduct – Coaches

Approved by the Board of Directors P&DBA Inc.

Basketball Australia’s Coaches Commission has spent over twelve months investigating the formalising of a set of Etiquette Guidelines. The result is a voluntary code, formulated to encourage a culture of professional standards within our Australian Coaching fraternity. This document which has been processed by basketball coaches for basketball coaches is subject to an annual review and is to be seen as a living document.

  • That you will abide by the policy and guidelines of the statutory requirements of the NSW legislation in relation to child protection and BNSW’s sports rage guidelines.
  • Be reasonable in your demands on young players’ time, energy and enthusiasm.
  • Teach your players that the rules of the game are mutual agreements, which no one should evade or break.
  • Whenever possible, group players according to age, height, skills and physical maturity.
  • Avoid over-playing the talented players. The “just-average” players need, and deserve, equal time.
  • Remember that children play for fun and enjoyment and the winning is only part of their motivation. Never ridicule children for making mistakes or losing a game.
  • Ensure that equipment and facilities meet safety standards and are appropriate to the age and ability of the players.
  • The scheduling and length of practice times and competition should take into consideration the maturity level of players.
  • Develop team respect for the ability of opponents as well as for the judgement of officials and opposing coaches.
  • Follow the advice of a physician when determining when an injured player is ready to recommence play.
  • Be aware of the role of the coach as an educator. As well as imparting knowledge and skills, promote desirable personal and social behaviours.
  • Seek to keep abreast of changes in the sport, ensure that the information used is up to date, appropriate to the needs of players and takes account of the principles of growth and development of children.
  • Profanity is unacceptable.
  • Dress standards should be appropriate and project a positive image.
  • Immediately prior to a game commencing, shake hands with the opposition coach.
  • Immediately a game concludes both coaches should meet at the centre line to shake hands.
  • Acceptable behaviour by all personnel on the team bench (ie Doctors, Physios, Assistant Coaches, and Managers) is the responsibility of the Head Coach.
  • Only one team official at any one time should approach the scorebench.
  • Time-outs in the last minute(s) of games by a team with an unassailable winning margin should be for tactical reasons only. Therefore, “in your face”, time-outs are not acceptable behaviour.
  • Direct, hostile or negative comments to opposition coaches or players are unacceptable. Furthermore references made to “bait” opposition players or coaches are unacceptable.
  • Coaches should not make comments of a personally insulting nature about opposition Coaches or players in a public forum. This has particular relevance for the media.
  • Coaches should abide by the “spirit” as well as the “letter of the law”. This has particular relevance in situations where at the conclusion of a game the losing coach wants some local by-law invoked that will change the result. ie. 10 points deduction for incorrect shorts.
  • It is not acceptable to constantly beseech referees to make favourable calls on every play.
  • It is hypocritical to admonish a referee for not allowing the game to flow only when calls go against your team.
  • It is not acceptable for a Coach to make indirect comments towards referees that allocate blame or incompetence ie.
  • It is inappropriate for coaches to enlist or incite the crowd against the referees.
  • Every team member should play in every game.
  • Unless it is a team’s normal style to press defensively it is not appropriate to press weak teams.